(7 resources)

Are Palestinian-Arab Citizens in the Jewish State a Ticking Time Bomb?
Smooha, Sammy - University of Haifa
2011-09-22 12:08:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:24:00

The 1.1 million Palestinian-Arab citizens constitute 17 percent of Israel's population. Scholars, media analysts, and policymakers see them as a radicalizing minority. The Arabs view Jews and Israel as becoming ever more hardline entities. There is a widespread fear that these clashing trends could lead to a violent confrontation. Two different sets of representative survey data for the years 1976-2010 and 2003-2010 will be presented. They bear on the image of Palestinian-Arab citizens as a time ticking bomb, on the image of Jews as an intransigent majority, and on the question if state policy toward the Arab minority does matter.

Sammy Smooha is a 2011-2012 Frankel Institute Fellow
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
The Absence of Rights Discourse in American Jewish Women’s Pre-World War II Social and Political Activism
Klapper, Melissa - Rowan University
2011-10-27 12:10:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:13:00

One might expect that any tale of activist women, struggling to make their voices heard, improve their status, and affect real change in the world would necessarily be a tale of rights narrowly gained and tenuously retained. Yet it turns out that at least one significant group of activists fighting for what later generations of feminists, historians, and activists might label citizenship rights, reproductive rights, and human rights rarely spoke of rights at all. To be sure, American Jewish suffragists certainly incorporated "rights talk" into their activism, but when they turned to their causes post-1920, most notably birth control and peace, rights talk disappeared almost completely from their vocabulary. The absence of rights discourse holds meaning for several larger discussions about gender and political culture, Jewish integration into the American body politic, and successful activist strategies.

Melissa Klapper is a 2011-2012 Frankel Institute Fellow
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
The Freedoms for Which We Fight: Religions, Difference, and Democracy in America's "Good War"
Bruch, Mia - Stanford University
2011-11-03 12:10:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:11:00

Taking a fresh look at the historical significance of World War II for American history, this talk explores the role of religion in the nation's response to fascism. Religion influenced the articulation and defense of American democratic values and created a "faith-based" mobilization against fascism that reshaped discourse on Judaism, difference and diversity in the United States.

Introduction by Deborah Dash-Moore, Frankel Center Director

Mia Bruch is a 2011-2012 Frankel Institute Fellow
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Freedom of Conscience and the Jews of Early Modern Amsterdam
Bodian, Miriam - University of Texas at Austin
2011-12-01 12:10:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:04:00

This presentation analyzes the meanings of the concept of "freedom of conscience" for the Sephardi Jews of seventeenth-century Amsterdam. It explores the attraction of these Jews to this concept, on the one hand, and the difficulties it posed for both of them, both practical and theological, on the other. It also examines how the concepts of "b'nei noach" and "hasidei umot ha-olam" were invoked to emphasize a positive view of gentiles and their worship, while skirting the problem of Christian "idolatry."

Introduction by Deborah Dash-Moore, Frankel Center Director

Miriam Bodian is a 2011-2012 Frankel Institute Fellow
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
The Politics of the Society for the Promotion of Enlightenment Among the Jews of Russia
Horowitz, Brian - Tulane University
2012-01-26 12:10:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:01:00

In this lecture, Horowitz shows how the Society, established by Russia’s wealthiest Jews in 1863 with the aim of spreading enlightenment, became inflected with Jewish nationalism in the 1880s. Examining the ideal of the society’s leaders to unite the struggle for personal and collective cultural rights, he draws attention to two contexts: efforts to create an ideal modern Jewish school and Jewish relief work during World War I.

Brian Horowitz is the Sizeler Family Chair Professor of Jewish Studies at Tulane University. He is the author of three published books and two edited volumes. His own books are: Jewish Philanthropy and Enlightenment in Late-Tsarist Russia (U of Washington Press, 2009); Empire Jews (Slavica, 2009); The Myth of A. S. Pushkin in Russia's Silver Age (Northwestern U. P. 1997) and, now, another book of essays: Russian Idea: Jewish Presence (Academic Studies Press) in Lazar Fleishman's series on Russian Literature and Culture. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Yad Hanadiv, Lady Davis, Fulbright, and the Alexander Von Humboldt research fellowship. While a fellow at the Frankel Institute, he is pursuing research for a critical biography of Vladimir Jabotinsky.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Political Culture of FSU Jews in Germany, Israel and Ukraine
Bagno-Moldavski, Olena - Tulane University
2012-02-09 12:11 PM
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:17:00

Bagno-Moldavski discusses the political integration of Jewish immigrants. She argues that adult immigrants adjust their political norms and behaviors to those prevalent in the receiving country, challenging the thesis that people choose their destinations, inter alia, on the basis of their political outlooks. She compares political values, norms, and behaviors of Russian-speaking Jews in Germany, Israel, and Ukraine, and provides an overview of the political backgrounds of these countries. Bagno-Moldavski discusses differences in the political cultures of Russian-speaking Jews.

Olena Bagno-Moldavski received her Ph.D. from Tel Aviv University in 2010. In 2008-2011 she was a Neubauer research fellow in the Institute for National Security Studies in Israel, and in 2011 she was a post-doctoral fellow in the Political Science department at Stanford University.

Currently a fellow at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies, her academic interests lie in the sphere of comparative politics, immigrants' and minorities' political culture in democracies, and various aspects of Jewish emigration from the FSU.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
The Soul in Pieces: On the Platonic Roots of Evil in the Thought of Leo Strauss
Schlie, Michael - Stanford University
2012-02-16 12:09 PM
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 00:57:24

Michael Schlie discusses the concept of evil in the political philosophy of Leo Strauss. He argues that Strauss' belief in the innate dangerousness of human beings is not, as many critics contend, the result of a nihilistic or anti-liberal philosophical outlook, but is derived rather from Strauss' interpretation of Plato. By comparing Strauss' understanding of evil to similar theories in the work of Thomas Hobbes and Carl Schmitt, Schlie demonstrates how, for Strauss, the problem of evil is not a moral dilemma, but an intellectual one.

Michael Schlie received his Ph.D. in Germanic Studies and Comparative Literature from Indiana University in 2011. His research has been supported by fellowships from the Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the American Council of Learned Societies.

Currently a fellow at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Jewish Studies, his research focuses on modern Jewish thought and political theory and on the intersection between philosophy and literature.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...