(12 resources)

In The Alpine Laboratory
Kulper, Amy Catania - University of Michigan
2011-09-13 12:33:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:20:00

What compelled French architect, theorist and enthusiastic mountaineer Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc to write an exhaustive text on the geological formation of Mont Blanc in 1876? What would inspire a restoration architect to consider, in excruciatingly tedious detail, the natural creation of glaciers and moraines? In the opening paragraphs of the book, Viollet reveals that being on the slopes of Mont Blanc is like being in a laboratory in which one can observe the "gigantic operations" of the natural world. Viollet's text is one of the earliest examples of the use of the laboratory paradigm in architectural discourse, and this lecture will examine the operations of this paradigm in Viollet's experimental theories.

These ruminations on Viollet's work in the alpine laboratory are the establishing shot for Amy Catania Kulper’s book, Immanent Natures: The Laboratory as Paradigm for Architecture's Experimental Practices. Central to her research is the concept of 'immanent natures' – a compensatory process of representation that seeks to identify the various manifestations of metaphysics, and its transcendental categories, within the immediacy of the scientific paradigm. Thus, as an opening salvo, Viollet’s alpine laboratory establishes a number of themes for the book. It raises questions of boundaries, both literal and figurative, from the contested geopolitical territory of Mont Blanc to the disputed limits of disciplinary knowledge. It elucidates the human appropriation of the natural world's generative capacities, examining the scientific conceit of ex nihilo creation and the modern cosmogonies it propagated. It is a locus that captures the elision of human history and natural history, and mimics their operations as formalized experiences and incrementalized natural processes that together fuel modern architectural production.

In Viollet's alpine laboratory, we witness the reckoning of the emancipated knowledge of the scientist with the practical wisdom of the architect.

Amy Catania Kulper is an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Michigan's Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. For the 2010-2011 academic year, she was the Steelcase Research professor at the University's Humanities Institute where she was working on the manuscript for a book titled Immanent Natures: The Laboratory as Paradigm for Architecture's Experimental Practices. Amy serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Architectural Education, where she is the Design Editor designate. Her publications have appeared as chapters in Experiments: Architecture Between Sciences and the Arts edited by Akos Moravansky and Albert Kirchengast; Intimate Metropolis: Urban Subjects in the Modern City edited by Diana Periton and Vittoria di Palma; and Visions of the Industrial Age: Modernity and the Anxiety of Representation in European Culture, 1830-1914, edited by Amy Woodson-Boulton and Minsoo Kang. Her articles appear in Journal of Architecture and Candide: Journal of Architectural Knowledge, and Field: Journal for Architecture. Amy is a three-time recipient of the Donna M. Salzer Award for teaching excellence at the University of Michigan. Her current research explores the conceptualization of the natural world in the context of a discipline whose divided institutional legacy frames the natural either as an applied science or a fine art. Her questions are lodged in this artificial distinction, and emanate from a desire to craft alternative narratives for the influences of science and scientism on architectural discourse.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Technological Enchantment and Literacy in the Digital Age
Gunsberg, Benjamin - University of Michigan
2011-09-20 12:33:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:20:00

As rhetorician Richard Lanham suggests in The Economics of Attention, digital media puts words into competitive relations with other modes of signification. On the Web, words compete with sounds, images, and interactive elements, and this competition does not always work out well for words. In light of these competitive relations, Ben Gunsberg’s dissertation, The Old Promise of New Writing, argues that it is important for literacy theorists to attend to the ways value circulates between people and the media they use. For those interested in the pedagogical implications of these dynamics, it is crucial to examine how the value attributed to and instantiated in different media affect actors’ beliefs about their own potency as authors, teachers, and students. During this presentation, Gunsberg provides an overview of the ways conceptions of literacy and writing instruction are shifting in response to the rise of digital media. Analyzing interview responses and college undergraduates’ multimedia compositions, he highlights some of the ways students are responding critically to the “enchanting” aspects of our precipitous digital revolution.

Ben Gunsberg is a PhD candidate in the Joint Program in English and Education at the University of Michigan. For the 2010-2011 academic year, he was the Sylvia Duffy Engle Graduate Student Fellow at the Institute for the Humanities. Gunsberg has been a HASTAC Scholar and a member of the English Editorial Board for the Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT). His article “Make it Now: QuickMuse and the Arrival of Fast-Track Composition” is forthcoming in the Journal of Electronic Publishing.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
The Making of Waiting for the Extraordinary
Dion, Mark - University of Michigan
2011-09-27 12:34:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:21:00

In "Waiting for the Extraordinary," a new site-specific installation commissioned by the Institute for the Humanities gallery, Dion focuses his enquiry on Michigan Chief Justice Augustus Woodward's territorial act of 1817, establishing a "Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania." Woodward harbored a dream of classifying all human knowledge and had discussed this with his friend and mentor Thomas Jefferson. For the Institute for the Humanities project, Dion imagines what objects would best represent these classifications and sets out to find them in the departments and collections within the university.

Mark Dion, the 2011–12 Paula and Edwin Sidman Fellow in the Arts, was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, and lives in New York and Pennsylvania. He holds a BFA and an honorary doctorate from the University of Hartford School of Art.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Velocity/Growth: Essays and Experiments in the Digital Humanities
Brunton, Finn - University of Michigan
2011-10-04 12:30:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:27:00

Using this talk as an opportunity to open some conversations and try out some ideas—by way of an introduction to his work, and a starting point for collaborations—Brunton presents five brief essays and short experiments (the words are deeply related). These add up to an argument for an approach to the digital humanities as a twenty-first century intellectual project, and outline his methods for getting to grips with it.

These five essays: "Information Overload: Moscow, 1959,” "Hopeless Diamond (On Robot-Readability)," "Crowdware: Oklahoma and /b/, 2009," "Meganarratives: Paris, 1911," and "The Victim Cloud: On Spam." All draw on Brunton’s recent work, and on projects now in progress. Themes covered include the economics of spam, distributed punishment networks, fan fiction, dead programming languages, emergent games, web typography, the design of fighter jets, and the revival of the essay as a preeminent form for digital humanist analysis.

Finn Brunton is assistant professor of digital environments at the School of Information at the University of Michigan. He was trained principally in the history of science, receiving a PhD from the Centre for Modern Thought at the University of Aberdeen, and an MA from the European Graduate School in Switzerland. He has worked extensively on issues of privacy and security online as a postdoctoral researcher with Helen Nissenbaum at NYU. He now focuses on technological adaptation and misuse, writing on topics including digital anonymity and encrypted currency, and the history of experimental and obsolete media. He is currently preparing a book, The Spew: A History of Spam, for MIT's Infrastructures series.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
A Creole Family And Its Slaves In Saint-Domingue And Cuba: A Narrative Of A Trans-Atlantic Experience
Iglesias, Marial - University of Havana
2011-10-11 12:40:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:21:00

A family of French planters in Jérémie, in southern Saint-Domingue, whose world falls apart due to the revolution in Haiti, recreates the economy (material and moral) of the coffee plantation in Cuba. The lives of the Despaignes, both masters and slaves, descendants of Europeans and the offspring of Africans, were tied for three generations to a piece of land in the mountains of el Cobre, near Santiago de Cuba, whose exploitation resulted in a bonanza for the white owners and in physical violence and dehumanization for its victims. Half a century later, the outbreak of the Cuban wars of independence from Spain emancipated the numerous slaves from the plantation. Their citizen status, in the Cuban Republic of the twentieth century, was put to the test as the 1912 uprising of the Independent Party of Color traumatically brought back the memory of Haiti to Cuba.

Marial Iglesias Utset has been a professor of philosophy and history at the University of Havana for the past 25 years. Her book Las metáforas del cambio en la vida cotidiana, a history of everyday life in Cuba during the US military occupation (1898-1902), has received several prizes, including the Clarence H. Haring Prize, a quinquennial prize awarded by the American Historical Association. The book has been recently translated into English and published by the University of North Carolina Press under the title A Cultural History of Cuba during the US Occupation, 1898-1902. For her current research project, “A Creole Family and Its Slaves in Saint-Domingue and Cuba: A Narrative of a Trans-Atlantic Experience,” a narration of the Atlantic travels of a single family and its slaves that links the lives of Europeans born on the French Atlantic coast, people from west-central Africa, and Caribbean Creoles, she has been awarded a long-term fellowship from the John Carter Brown Library.

Special thanks to Rebecca Scott for providing translation
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Improvisation as a Way of Life, Part 1
Davidson, Arnold - University of Chicago
2011-10-19 17:24:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 00:44:00

Many musical improvisors have understood their sounds and practices as addressing larger questions of identity and social organization, as well as creating politically inflected, critically imbued aesthetic spaces. Following a 1964 suggestion by Alfred Schutz that “a study of the social relationships connected with the musical process may lead to some insights valid for many other forms of social intercourse,” the realization that improvisation is not limited to the artistic domain, but is a ubiquitous aspect of everyday life, can lead humanists and scientists toward new models of intelligibility, agency, ethics, technology, and social transformation.

Arnold I. Davidson is the Robert O. Anderson Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of Comparative Literature, the Committee on the Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, and the Divinity School at the University of Chicago. Executive editor of Critical Inquiry, he is also a director of the France-Chicago Center. His major fields of research and teaching are the history of contemporary European philosophy, the history of moral and political philosophy, the history of the human sciences, and the history and philosophy of religion.

Introduction by Daniel Herwitz, Director of the Institute for the Humanities
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Improvisation as a Way of Life, Part 2
Lewis, George - Columbia University
2011-10-19 18:10:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 00:47:00

(Continued)

Many musical improvisors have understood their sounds and practices as addressing larger questions of identity and social organization, as well as creating politically inflected, critically imbued aesthetic spaces. Following a 1964 suggestion by Alfred Schutz that “a study of the social relationships connected with the musical process may lead to some insights valid for many other forms of social intercourse,” the realization that improvisation is not limited to the artistic domain, but is a ubiquitous aspect of everyday life, can lead humanists and scientists toward new models of intelligibility, agency, ethics, technology, and social transformation.

George Lewis is the Edwin H. Case Professor of American Music at Columbia University. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship in 2002, an Alpert Award in the Arts in 1999, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Lewis studied composition with Muhal Richard Abrams at the AACM School of Music, and trombone with Dean Hey. Lewis's work as composer, improvisor, performer and interpreter explores electronic and computer music, computer-based multimedia installations, text-sound works, and notated and improvisative forms, and is documented on more than 140 recordings.

Including a Q&A discussion with Arnold Davidson
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Digital, Scholarly Publishing: A Systems View
Pochoda, Phillip - University of Michigan
2011-10-25 12:33:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:15:00

The system of scholarly publishing that we are familiar with took shape only about fifty years ago, in the 1960s. At that time, US university presses began universalizing the practice of anonymous peer reviewing of both journal articles and monographs (the exclusive, binary publishing formats). Almost all institutions of higher learning began requiring published books or a quantity of articles as an integral part of faculty promotion and tenure processes. Lavish government funding underwrote, directly and indirectly, much university-based research and resulting publication, and well-funded libraries were able to support expanded publishing activities. Now, after half a century of productive publishing, that print-based publishing order is in its final throes of dissolution, having suffered the combined blows of withdrawal of external funding and significant loss of revenue overall, drastically declining demand from libraries and scholarly customers, and, most importantly, the digital revolution which challenges every aspect and assumption of the legacy print publishing process. This presentation will barely sketch the scope and the transformed and transforming ingredients of the system of scholarly publishing as it is being radically reconstituted for and by the digital environment, from a stable, bounded, well-ordered and well-policed publishing circuit into one that is inherently unstable and shape-shifting in all its elements and networked connections, increasingly pluralistic and boundless, and unimaginably rich in future publishing options and opportunities.

Introduction by Daniel Herwitz, Director of the Institute for the Humanities

Phil Pochoda recently retired as director of the University of Michigan Press. Previously, he was associate director and editorial director of the University Press of New England; editorial director of Anchor Books and Dial Press at Doubleday; and vice-president at Simon & Schuster while publisher and editor-in-chief of Prentice-Hall Press. He has written numerous articles on digitization and the future of university presses.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
"Strange and Unexplainable Fits": On Network Fevers
Hu, Tung-Hui - University of Michigan
2011-11-08 12:40:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:04:00

Network structures—formless, cloudlike, decentralized—seem to be everywhere. The Occupy Wall Street protests are described as a form of "cloud protesting" that, like the Internet, resists the "hierarchical centralization of 'the mob.'" At the same time, global terror movements, such as al-Qaeda, also seem to be rhizomic, cellular, emergent. But how did power come to take the shape of the network? And what are the eventual consequences of network fever? This talk approaches these questions through one widely held belief: that the Internet took on a decentralized shape in order to resist a Soviet nuclear strike. Using the lens of American politics from May to July 1961, this talk offers a critical re-reading of one of the founding myths of network culture.

Introduction by Daniel Herwitz, Director of the Institute for the Humanities

A co-organizer of the Digital Environments Cluster, Tung-Hui Hu is assistant professor of English and screen arts at the University of Michigan. His research focuses on experimental film and media and, more generally, the intersection of politics and visibility. After working as a network architect, Hu received his PhD in rhetoric and film studies at UC Berkeley. He is also the author of three books of poetry, most recently Greenhouses, Lighthouses, forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Mapping Digital Humanities Today
Klein, Julie Thompson - Wayne State University
2011-11-15 12:40:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:05:00

Digital humanities is a rapidly growing field at the intersections of computing and disciplines of humanities and arts; the professions of education and of library and information science; and interdisciplinary fields of media, communications, and cultural studies. In this overview, Klein maps the evolution and major discourses of digital humanities. The conventional origin story begins in the late 1940s in computational linguistics. The field expanded significantly with the advent of the Internet, new media, and digital-born objects and materials.

Patrik Svensson’s modes of epistemic engagement provide an opening framework. Svensson proposed five modes: as a tool, a study object, an experimental laboratory, an expressive medium, and an activist venue. Other classifications also benchmark shifts in the practices and identity of the field: from “humanities computing” to “digital humanities,” from Humanities 1.0 to Humanities 2.0, and from Web 1.0 to Web 4.0. The recent rise of blogging humanities and multimodal humanities highlights new forms of publication and scholarly communication, amplified by new affordances of visualization and spatialization. And, heightened interest in digital media and learning is fostering new pedagogies, modes of learning, and literacies.

The “interdisciplinary shift work” of digital humanities, to borrow a concept from Anne Balsamo, is not a single form of work. Methodological interdisciplinarity accentuates tools and methods that form the backbone of sites and resources we rely on daily. Critical interdisciplinarity interrogates the nature and implications of new technologies and media, a project evident in critical cyberculture studies, internet studies, and critical gaming studies. Theoretical interdisciplinarity engages epistemological reflection on computing and on knowledge representation, inquiries gaining force today in code studies, software studies, cultural informatics and analytics. Join us to explore the contours and edges of the heterogeneous field of digital humanities.

Julie Thompson Klein, professor of humanities in the English department at Wayne State University, is a Mellon Visiting Fellow in the Digital Humanities at the U-M Institute for the Humanities. She is co-editor of the University of Michigan Press series digitalhumanities@digitalculturebooks, and her book Mapping Digital Humanities is forthcoming from U-M Press. Klein also serves on the executive board of HASTAC (the Humanities Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory). She is an internationally known expert on interdisciplinary history, theory, and practice.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
After the Archive: Scholarship in the Digital Era
McPherson, Tara - University of Southern California
2011-11-29 12:40:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:20:00

Can scholarship show as well as tell? Can it engage new sensory and emotional registers? Might we present our evidence in livelier formats or embed an analysis within a dataset? How might scholars better utilize the rich variety of digital materials now available? Can we imagine new human and technological infrastructures for scholarly publishing? This talk engages such questions through an exploration of two recent experiments in scholarly communication.

First, McPherson presents the online journal, Vectors, and describes its lively attempts at remaking the look and feel of scholarly work. Second, she discusses the emerging Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, an initiative funded by the Mellon Foundation that is meant to scale the experiments of Vectors to a much wider audience and model new forms of scholarly expression and publication.

Tara McPherson is associate professor of Gender and Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts and co-director of USC’s Center for Transformative Scholarship. She also serves as the faculty chair for USC’s Provost Initiative in the Arts and Humanities. Her books and edited collections include Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South, Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture, and Digital Youth, Innovation and the Unexpected. Interactive Frictions, coedited with Marsha Kinder, is forthcoming from the University of California. Her new media research focuses on issues of convergence, gender, and race, as well as upon the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Changes in Communication that Derive from New Information Technologies
Courant, Paul - University of Michigan
2011-12-13 12:35:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:30:00

Digitization is seen variously as a boon and scourge, depending on the viewer, the issue at hand, and sometimes even the time of day. As with many polarizing phenomena, there is merit on both sides. If we look carefully at the functions that we want libraries to perform, we see that although most (but not all) are made technically easier with digitization, many are made organizationally more difficult, both within libraries and within the institutions that support them and use them. Preservation, which Courant argues is an essential function of academic libraries, is the most straightforward example of something that is much more difficult to organize with digital media than it was with print. Scholarly publishing, without which libraries would have little to do, is stuck with a set of institutions and practices that are ill-suited to take advantage of digital technologies. And then there is copyright. Taking as given that we now live in a world where it extremely inexpensive to copy, distribute, search, mix, and remix, it is still not entirely clear how best to respond to what should be good news. The answers depend on what we want and how willing we are to collaborate in the interest of achieving it. As in many cases, successful exploitation of changes in technology requires changes in the way activities are organized.

Paul Courant is the University Librarian and Dean of Libraries at the University of Michigan. He is also Harold T. Shapiro Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Economics, professor of information, and faculty associate in the Institute for Social Research. He has authored half a dozen books, and over seventy papers covering a broad range of topics in economics and public policy. More recently, he is studying the economics of universities, the economics of libraries and archives, and the changes in the system of scholarly communication that derive from new information technologies.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...