(12 resources)

Thing of the Past: On Hegel and Contemporary Art History
Melville, Stephen - Ohio State University
2009-01-13 12:10:14-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:21:56

Stephen Melville (History of Art, Ohio State University) has published widely on contemporary art as well as on issues in contemporary theory and historiography. He served as resident faculty at the Getty Summer Institute in Visual and Cultural Studies (University of Rochester, 1999), and gave invited lectures at Cornell University (Ruth Woolsey Findley and William Nichols Findley Lecture), The Johns Hopkins University, and The Tate Modern in London. With Philip Armstrong (Division of Comparative Studies) and Laura Lisbon (Painting), he curated a major exhibition of contemporary painting at the Wexner Center for the Arts in May, 2001. The exhibition was accompanied by a substantial catalogue from The MIT Press. He has been active on numerous committees for the American Society for Aesthetics and has been on the editorial board for both the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism and the Oxford Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. His recent publications include As Painting: Division and Displacement, the catalog that accompanied the 2001 exhibit, and Seams: Art as a Philosophical Context (New York: Gordon and Breach, 1996).
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Tell It Like It Is: Thinking about Public Space and the Media in China
Berry, Chris - University of London
2009-01-20 12:33:03-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:21:44

Tell It Like It Is is the English title of one of many talk shows that have proliferated on Chinese television, along with investigative reporter magazine shows, and documentary. However, the media remain state-owned and subject to government censorship in China. How should we understand this seemingly contradictory situation? In this talk, Chris Berry argues that using a "public sphere" model in which "freedom" is equated to the removal of state power is both false and subjects the Chinese case to American ideological standards.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Poetry Reading from AMORISCO
Mattawa, Khaled - University of Michigan
2009-01-27 12:12:44-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 00:41:49

Khaled Mattawa is the author of three books of poetry: Amorisco (Ausable Press, 2008), Zodiac of Echoes (Ausable Press, 2003) and Ismailia Eclipse (Sheep Meadow Press, 1996). He has translated five books of contemporary Arab poetry by Saadi Youssef, Fadhil Al-Azzawi, Hatif Janabi, and Maram Al-Massri, and co-edited two anthologies of Arab American literature. Mattawa has been award the PEN award for literary translation, a Guggenheim fellowship, the Alfred Hodder fellowship from Princeton University, an NEA translation grant, and two Pushcart prizes. His poems have appeared in Poetry, The Kenyon Review, Antioch Review, Best American Poetry, and many other journals. Mattawa was born in Libya and came to the United States in his teens. He is on the faculty of the MFA Program in Creative Writing, Department of English, University of Michigan.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
From Boston to Bosphorus: Transculturation of New England Protestantism and College Education in the 19th-century Ottoman Empire
Gur, Asli - University of Michigan
2009-02-03 12:14:18-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:26:08

This talk is an invitation to rethink the power relations and the transculturation processes between nineteenth-century empires in light of a case where no formal or informal colonial relationship to facilitate such processes was in place. It is based on a study of the transculturation process of the New England college model into the educational field of the Ottoman Empire through the actions of Protestant missionaries. From a relational perspective and building on the global fields approach in historical sociology, it explores the possible comparisons between the religious and educational landscapes of the 19th century New England and the cosmopolitan Ottoman cities. The presentation aims to illustrate that in order to interpret the complex cultural translations regarding state-society relations, imperialism, religion, education and masculinity that occurred between American missionaries, Ottoman bureaucrats, the students and the communities they come from during the institutional transculturation, we have to engage in an analysis of the involved actors’ actions in a manner that articulates the various cultural spaces they inhabited simultaneously although they may be oceans apart: their referential cultural spaces, their local, everyday cultural landscapes and the global field within which these geographically and culturally separate spheres relate to one another.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Please Respond: Provoking 'Difficult' Encounters in Today's Post-Holocaust Poland
Lehrer, Erica - Concordia University
2009-02-12 12:10:49-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:13:53

Erica Lehrer (History/Anthropology/Sociology, Concordia University, Montreal) was awarded an honorable mention in the 2008 Emerging Scholars Prize administered by the Institute for the Humanities. She is a former Graduate Student Fellow of the Institute. She completed her B.A. at Grinnell College, her M.A., a certificate in Museum Studies, and her Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. Her dissertation, entitled "'Shoah-Business,' Holocaust Culture, and the Repair of the World in 'Post-Jewish' Poland: a Quest for Ethnography, Empathy, and the Ethnic Self after Genocide," examined the emerging phenomenon of Jewish heritage tourism to Eastern Europe. Her recent article, "Bearing False Witness? Vicarious Jewish Identity and the Politics of Affinity," is published in Imaginary Neighbors: Mediating Polish-Jewish Relations after the Holocaust, edited by Dorota Glowacka and Joanna Zylinska, University of Nebraska Press, 2007.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
What is Aljazeera?
Cole, Juan - University of Michigan
2009-02-17 12:09:45-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:18:14

Juan R. I. Cole is the Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan. For three decades he has sought to put the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context. His most recent book is Engaging the Muslim World (Palgrave Macmillan, March, 2009) and he also recently authored Napoleon's Egypt: Invading the Middle East (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). He has been a regular guest on PBS's Lehrer News Hour, and has also appeared on ABC Nightly News, Nightline, the Today Show, Charlie Rose, Anderson Cooper 360, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Democracy Now! and many others. He has also given many radio and press interviews. He has written extensively about Egypt, Iran, Iraq, and South Asia. He has commented extensively on the Iraq War, the politics of Pakistan and Afghanistan, and the increasing conflict with Iran. He has a regular column at Salon.com. He continues to study and write about contemporary Islamic movements, whether mainstream or radical, whether Sunni and Salafi or Shi`ite. Cole commands Arabic, Persian and Urdu and reads some Turkish, knows both Middle Eastern and South Asian Islam. He lived in various parts of the Muslim world for nearly 10 years, and continues to travel widely there.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
News Without Newspapers
Darnton, John - University of Michigan
2009-03-03 12:16:19-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:14:19

John Darnton is an award-winning journalist and best-selling novelist. He worked for 40 years for The New York Times as a reporter, foreign correspondent and editor. He won two George Polk awards and the Pulitzer Prize. He has written four novels: Neanderthal and The Experiment, both on the New York Times best-seller list, and Mind Catcher and the Darwin Conspiracy.

A large version of this presentation is available for viewing.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
If Honesty is the Best Policy, What's Next Best? The Ethos and Ethics of the Political Cartoons of The New Yorker
Mankoff, Robert - University of Michigan
2009-03-10 12:10:57-05:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:02:33

Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker and president of The Cartoon Bank, is one of the nation’s leading commentators on the role of humor in American politics, business and life. He edited The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker (Black Dog & Leventhal), the best-selling coffee table book for holiday 2004, featuring all 68,647 cartoons ever published in The New Yorker since its debut in 1925. He describes this as the golden age of humor, where humor helps build personal connections in business and personal relationships. Mankoff has edited dozens of cartoon books, published four of his own, and is an accomplished cartoonist. In fact, over 800 of his cartoons have been published in The New Yorker over the past 20 years, including the best-selling New Yorker cartoon of all time (the harried businessman at his desk with a phone to his ear, reviewing his calendar and saying: “No, Thursday’s out, how about never. Is never good for you?”) He is the author of The Naked Cartoonist, a book published in 2003 on the creative process behind developing magazine-style cartoons.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Documenting the Global Cities of Los Angeles and Beijing, Learning about Democracy in Summer Exchange Workshops
Kinder, Marsha - University of Michigan
2009-03-17 12:12:16-04:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:08:08

Marsha Kinder is Director of The Labyrinth Project in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. For three successive summers, film students and teachers from USC's School of Cinematic Arts in Los Angeles and the Communication University of China in Beijing participated in a documentary workshop exchange. Each Chinese student was paired with a USC student, and together each pair made a 10 minute video doc on the city. What did they learn about cultural exchange in the process?
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
Objectivity and Knowledge: A Dilemma is Modern Philosophy
Kment, Boris - University of Michigan
2009-03-24 12:13:21
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:18:41

Objectivity and Knowledge: A Dilemma is Modern Philosophy
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
The Prison, the Mall, and the Archive: Rethinking the Dictatorships at the End of History
Draper, Susana - Princeton University
2009-03-31 12:12:16-04:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:09:00

Susana Draper, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, Princeton University, was awarded an honorable mention in the Emerging Scholars Prize. She tells a compelling story about the physical transformation of a former prison run by a fascist regime in Uruguay which is today a shopping mall. She received her doctorate from U-M in Romance Languages and Literatures. Professor Draper's talk in our series draws on "The Prison, the Mall, and the Archive (Space, Literature, and Visual Arts in Postdictatorship Cultures)," her current book-length project on spaces and temporalities in contemporary Latin American cities, with a special focus on the transformations of prisons and clandestine detention centers (Punta Carretas, Lecumberri, ESMA and ‘Olimpo’), and the works of literature, critical theory, and visual arts that problematize them. Other areas of interest include contemporary Latin American literature and visual arts, continental philosophy, spatial theory and prison writing. She is author of Ciudad posletrada y tiempos lúmpenes: crítica cultural y nihilismo en la cultura de fin de siglo (in press). She is also preparing an anthology The Malling of Latin America: thinking about the cities after the cold war era.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...
How Can We all be in this Together if We live in Different Realities? or Whatever Happened to Culture and Communication?
Grossberg, Lawrence - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2009-04-07 12:15:39-04:00
Ann Arbor, MI - University of Michigan - Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer St.
Duration: 01:14:00

Lawrence Grossberg is Morris Davis Distinguished Professor of Communication Studies and Cultural Studies, Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Anthropology and Geography, and Director, University Program in Cultural Studies at the University of North Carolina. In his contribution to our series on Talk Show Democracy, Professor Grossberg will consider the inability of contemporary models of culture to respond to the changing realities of contemporary political struggles. If culture is a concept that emerges from particular contexts, how do we explore, simultaneously, the changing nature of the contexts, and the demands for another theory of culture.
http://lecb.physics.lsa.umich.edu/CWIS/browser.php?ResourceI...